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The last couple of custom Drupal themes I created called for a very simple grid system to be included in the project.  For example, lets say we needed to work off of a grid of 12 columns.  Normally we would need to go through and take the outside width of the parent container and divide each column up by this width and set each column by hand to get the exact width of each column in our grid.   This seems like a rather tedious method that probably would require me or some poor soul working with me to rework many times over the course of project.

Lately I have been writing a lot of C++ on Linux and have been really enjoying it.  I love the flexibility of jumping right in on the terminal, writing my code, and compiling all from one spot.    As my writing continued and my program evolved I realized that I needed some worker threads to process some pretty expensive computation that I did not want hogging my main thread.  Coming from an iOS/OSX background I figured I could do some research and figure out a comparable replacement for how I would normally create background threads with Grand Central Dispatch.

Over the last year or so the Drupal projects I have been involved with at work have required the need to work with a lot of video files being maintained in Drupal.  Well, as you can imagine the larger the files we are maintaining the greater the strain this puts on our host to serve the files.  To try and account for this we moved as many of the assets in Drupal as we could off to a Rackspace Cloud Files account so they could be served from a cloud delivery network.

To illustrate the ease of using vanilla JavaScript over jQuery I decided to create a list of five examples that would demonstrate parallel behavior between JavaScript and jQuery.  The examples in this list are intended to be real world examples, but if you have any other examples I would love to hear about them too!

Another great resource to compare JavaScript and jQuery code samples is You Might Not Need jQuery.

 

If you have spent any time writing Object Oriented PHP or Drupal PHP you will know that there are many instances where it can be handy to know exactly what you are dealing with at a specific point in your code.  For example, possibly you are troubleshooting an issue and cannot figure out why a variable is not acting as it should, or maybe you are writing logging routines to make sure all of your exceptions are logged for future troubleshooting.  Whatever your needs may be it can be very helpful to use PHP Magic constants to assist you in your troubleshooting.